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KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!

“Growing up and becoming a teenager can be a bit of a strange but exciting time, everything suddenly seems so new... but it’s not always easy!”

LOIS

You’re on your way to becoming a young woman! Just remember that you’re a work in progress. Don’t worry if you’re changing slower or faster than anyone else. Every girl is different.

During puberty, your ovaries produce hormones responsible for some changes in your body. Here’s some of the things you can expect to happen as you start to enter puberty:

  • Your breasts start to grow – maybe it’s time to plan a shopping trip to try on some bras!
  • You become taller
  • You begin to grow body hair
  • You sweat more and your body develops odour – as your body changes, it’s important to use deodorant and maintain good personal hygiene
  • You may begin to notice your skin and hair getting oilier
  • You experience new emotions and feelings, you’ll probably notice that boys are developing them too!
  • You may get a white vaginal discharge – this is a completely normal and healthy part of being a woman. However if you’re concerned, consult your GP or a pharmacist
  • You start having periods

FAQs FOR GIRLS

A third of parents admit they don’t know the right products to recommend to their teens to help with puberty.*

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WHY DO I FEEL PAIN DURING MY PERIOD?

Some women hardly notice any discomfort during their period, others may experience cramps. You get cramps when your uterus contracts slightly to get rid of its lining. You may feel them during your period in your lower back or even legs. Not to worry! Cramps are normal and there are many ways to get relief, such as lying down if possible at the first sign of pain, gently rubbing your abdomen, taking mild exercise and stretching or taking a warm bath. 

SHOULD I TELL ANYONE WHEN MY FIRST PERIOD COMES?

You can if you want to! It’s an exciting thing to happen. Remember that all women have periods, so they know all about what to do and how to help you. If you don’t already have pads or tampons with you when your first period comes, then you will need to tell either a trusted adult or a friend so that they can give you some pads or tampons and give you some advice.

WHAT IF I’M AT SCHOOL WHEN MY FIRST PERIOD COMES?

Virtually all girls are taken by surprise when they get their first period – even if they’re quite well informed, so don’t worry. Some girls carry a pad and some clean underwear in a bag to be prepared just in case. A friend or a teacher are both good people to turn to for help. Most schools keep some spare pads for times like this.

WHAT IS A PANTY LINER?

Panty liners are an absorbent extra layer that can be added into underwear to absorb moisture. They’re really simple to use, the paper strip on the back of the panty liner covers a sticky part on the underneath, when removed, the liner can be attached securely to underwear.

WHEN MIGHT I USE A PANTY LINER?

Some women use panty liners daily to manage vaginal discharge, others use them primarily mid-cycle (during ovulation) to manage just their increased vaginal discharge. Other reasons for using panty liners might be as a back-up when wearing a tampon or as protection in anticipation of a period starting.

WHAT IS A TAMPON?

Tampons are sanitary protection that are worn inside your body. A tampon is made of soft absorbent material compressed into a small oblong shape with a cord securely sewn through it for removal. It’s held in place by the muscular walls of your vagina and gently expands to absorb your flow.

TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME

Toxic Shock Syndrome (or TSS) is associated with tampon use and is something you should be aware of once you start your periods, it is a rare but very serious illness which can be fatal. Some of the symptoms of Toxic Shock Syndrome are like the flu, a sudden high fever (usually over 39ºC or higher), vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle aches, a sun burn like rash, sore throat, and dizziness and/or fainting which can become serious quickly. If you have any of the symptoms shown, you must immediately remove your tampon and go to your nearest Accident & Emergency Department. Remember to tell the doctor that you’ve been using tampons. You can reduce the risk of TSS by ensuring that you read the leaflet thoroughly, which is included in the tampon pack before you use them, to ensure you use them in the correct way and change them every 4 to 8 hours or more often if needed. If you are in any way concerned that you may have developed TSS, it is important you seek help from a trusted adult or a healthcare professional immediately. 

For more questions about tampons, Toxic Shock Syndrome and PMS visit boots.com or boots.ie or toxicshock.com

WHICH PRODUCT IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Always Ultra has a great range of ultra-thin pads available in different sizes and absorbencies. Once girls are settled into a more regular routine with their periods, some try Tampax Compak Pearl which gives protection and discretion. But the most important thing is to keep the conversation open with a parent, teacher or GP. Everything you’re experiencing is perfectly normal.

PRODUCTS FOR GIRLS TO TRY

Tampax Compak Pearl Regular Applicator Tampons x18

£2.00

18UNI | £0.11 per 1UNI

1

Maximum quantity reached

Aussie 3 Minute Miracle Reconstructor Treatment 250ml 

£4.99

250ML | £2.00 per 100ML

1

Maximum quantity reached

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*#TeenTalk Survey conducted by One Poll on behalf of Boots and P&G, February 2016. All stats quoted are representative of parents surveyed in Britain and Ireland.

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