Top tips for an active pregnancy

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Top tips for an active pregnancy

Top tips for an active pregnancy

Active steps to help you stay in tip-top condition throughout your pregnancy

We know it's tempting to hit the sofa rather than the gym when you're pregnant, but it's really good for you and your growing baby to stay active... honest!

Now, more than ever, exercise is good for you, for lots of reasons. It can help:

  1. Your physical and mental wellbeing through pregnancy
  2. Prepare your body for childbirth, which let's face it, definitely puts your body through its paces
  3. Make it easier to get back into shape afterwards
  4. You may just need to reconsider what you do and when. To help, we've pulled together some dos and don'ts for pregnancy exercise to help keep you on the right track:

Pregnancy exercise: Do's

  • Remember to consult your GP or midwife before you start exercising during pregnancy
  • Drink plenty of water every day
  • If you're new to exercise or haven't exercised for a while, start by doing 10 minutes every day
    and add 1-2 minutes each week
  • Ultimately try and make the time for 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day. However, if you're an old pro and exercise on a regular basis you could increase this to 60 minutes. Remember, moderate exercise is where you are able to comfortably talk during your chosen activity
  • Ideal ways to exercise for pregnant women include walking and swimming
  • Teamwork: Exercise with other pregnant mums so you can share your experiences and motivate one another.

Myth-buster: It's okay to do abdominal exercises during pregnancy as this will not only strengthen the core area but could also help you during your labour and delivery. Do abdominal exercises in a kneeling or standing position after the first trimester.

Pelvic floor exercises

Mum Louise says

"I'm so glad I took the advice of my midwife and did my pelvic floor exercises. Some of my friends didn't bother and are constantly nipping to the loo saying they wish they'd done their pelvic floors! They really do work!"

Why are they so important?

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegels, will help to strengthen the muscles that support your bladder, uterus and bowel, which may help you during labour and delivery. And the best bit? Once you get the hang of them you can do them anytime, anywhere (even sitting down watching TV!) without anyone knowing you're doing them.

Something to shout about: We know incontinence may be seen as an old person's problem and not something you want to think about, but doing your pelvic floor exercises could reduce your chances of experiencing urinary incontinence after the baby is born.

Pelvic floor exercises: 3 simple steps

The pelvic floor is situated between the pubic bone and the tail bone:

  • Imagine you can pull these two points together and lift them up inside you
  • Pull up slowly, hold the muscles tight for 10 seconds and then release
  • Repeat the movement 10 times and do the exercises three times every day

Remember, practice makes perfect and trust us, it will be worth it!

Pregnancy exercise: Don'ts

  • Don't take part in activities such as horse-riding, downhill skiing, ice hockey, gymnastics or cycling because there's a risk of falling
  • Don't try a new sport without consulting your GP first
  • The highs and lows: Don't scuba dive or go up to altitudes of over 6,000 feet (1.8 metres)
  • Don't exercise lying on your back after the first trimester
  • Don't train for a sporting event, focus your exercising on you and your baby

Top tip: Your joints can be less stable and more vulnerable when you're pregnant due to the additional hormones, so take care when you're exercising and stop if you feel any pain or dizziness.

Read more like this:
New mum's exercise tips
Pregnancy symptoms

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Top tips for an active pregnancy
Active steps to help you stay in tip-top condition throughout your pregnancy

We know it's tempting to hit the sofa rather than the gym when you're pregnant, but it's really good for you and your growing baby to stay active... honest!

Now, more than ever, exercise is good for you, for lots of reasons. It can help:

  1. Your physical and mental wellbeing through pregnancy
  2. Prepare your body for childbirth, which let's face it, definitely puts your body through its paces
  3. Make it easier to get back into shape afterwards
  4. You may just need to reconsider what you do and when. To help, we've pulled together some dos and don'ts for pregnancy exercise to help keep you on the right track:
Pregnancy exercise: Do's
  • Remember to consult your GP or midwife before you start exercising during pregnancy
  • Drink plenty of water every day
  • If you're new to exercise or haven't exercised for a while, start by doing 10 minutes every day and add 1-2 minutes each week
  • Ultimately try and make the time for 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day. However, if you're an old pro and exercise on a regular basis you could increase this to 60 minutes. Remember, moderate exercise is where you are able to comfortably talk during your chosen activity
  • Ideal ways to exercise for pregnant women include walking and swimming
  • Teamwork: Exercise with other pregnant mums so you can share your experiences and motivate one another

Myth-buster: It's okay to do abdominal exercises during pregnancy as this will not only strengthen the core area but could also help you during your labour and delivery. Do abdominal exercises in a kneeling or standing position after the first trimester.

Pelvic floor exercises

Why are they so important?

Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegels, will help to strengthen the muscles that support your bladder, uterus and bowel, which may help you during labour and delivery. And the best bit? Once you get the hang of them you can do them anytime, anywhere (even sitting down watching TV!) without anyone knowing you're doing them.

Something to shout about: We know incontinence may be seen as an old person's problem and not something you want to think about, but doing your pelvic floor exercises could reduce your chances of experiencing urinary incontinence after the baby is born.

Pelvic floor exercises: 3 simple steps

The pelvic floor is situated between the pubic bone and the tail bone:

  • Imagine you can pull these two points together and lift them up inside you
  • Pull up slowly, hold the muscles tight for 10 seconds and then release
  • Repeat the movement 10 times and do the exercises three times every day

Remember, practice makes perfect and trust us, it will be worth it!

Pregnancy exercise: Don'ts
  • Don't take part in activities such as horse-riding, downhill skiing, ice hockey, gymnastics or cycling because there's a risk of falling
  • Don't try a new sport without consulting your GP first
  • The highs and lows: Don't scuba dive or go up to altitudes of over 6,000 feet (1.8 metres)
  • Don't exercise lying on your back after the first trimester
  • Don't train for a sporting event, focus your exercising on you and your baby

Top tip: Your joints can be less stable and more vulnerable when you're pregnant due to the additional hormones, so take care when you're exercising and stop if you feel any pain or dizziness.

Read more like this:
New mum's exercise tips

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