The ABC of pregnancy vitamins

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Information & Advice

WrittenbyParenting Club


The ABC of pregnancy vitamins

Make understanding pregnancy vitamins as easy as A, B, C with this handy guide

The ABC of pregnancy vitamins

Make understanding pregnancy vitamins as easy as A, B, C with this handy guide

Even though you may be eating a healthy pregnancy diet packed with fruit and vegetables, some vitamins and minerals are especially important during pregnancy, while others should be avoided.

Use our handy guide to help you understand which vitamins are the most important during pregnancy, why you need them and which foods to add to your shpping list to include them in your diet.

Fabulous folic acid

As soon as you decide to start trying for a baby the Department of Health recommends that you should take a supplement containing 400 micrograms of folic acid every day and continue until you are 12 weeks pregnant. Folic acid is particularly important in the very early stages of pregnancy and it contributes to maternal tissue growth. As well as the supplement, eat foods rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid) such as green leafy vegetables and brown rice.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps the body to absorb calcium and supports the bones. The main source of vitamin D is from the action of sunlight on the skin, however pregnant and breastfeeding women are particularly at risk of deficiency. UK Health Departments now recommend that all pregnant and breastfeeding women take a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D to ensure their own requirement for vitamin D is met. This in turn helps build adequate stores for the baby in early infancy.

You can also consider taking Pregnancy multivitamins which are specially formulated to contain a combination of the key vitamins and minerals to help support a healthy diet in pregnancy (including folic acid and vitamin D).


Pregnancy Vitamins

Healthy Start Scheme

You may be eligible for free vitamin supplements under the Government's Healthy Start scheme if you receive income support or income-based jobseeker's allowance. The vitamin tablets contain the recommended levels of folic acid and vitamin D plus vitamin C. For more information visit: http://www.healthystart.nhs.uk/healthy-start-vouchers


Advice on use of supplements

We recommend that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or planning a pregnancy consult their doctor, midwife or pharmacist before taking a supplement. Food supplements are not a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.




Always read the label as some supplements should NOT be taken in pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Read more like this:
The recipe for healthy eating in pregnancy
Top tips for an active pregnancy
A-Z of pregnancy niggles
Pregnancy symptoms

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The ABC of pregnancy vitamins

Make understanding pregnancy vitamins as easy as A, B, C with this handy guide

Even though you may be eating a healthy pregnancy diet packed with fruit and vegetables, some vitamins and minerals are especially important during pregnancy, while others should be avoided.

Use our handy guide to help you understand which vitamins are the most important during pregnancy, why you need them and which foods to add to your shpping list to include them in your diet.

Fabulous folic acid

As soon as you decide to start trying for a baby the Department of Health recommends that you should take a supplement containing 400 micrograms of folic acid every day and continue until you are 12 weeks pregnant. Folic acid is particularly important in the very early stages of pregnancy and it contributes to maternal tissue growth. As well as the supplement, eat foods rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid) such as green leafy vegetables and brown rice.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps the body to absorb calcium and supports the bones. The main source of vitamin D is from the action of sunlight on the skin, however pregnant and breastfeeding women are particularly at risk of deficiency. UK Health Departments now recommend that all pregnant and breastfeeding women take a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D to ensure their own requirement for vitamin D is met. This in turn helps build adequate stores for the baby in early infancy.

You can also consider taking Pregnancy multivitamins which are specially formulated to contain a combination of the key vitamins and minerals to help support a healthy diet in pregnancy (including folic acid and vitamin D).

Take a look at our downloadable guide to vitamins during pregnancy .


Pregnancy Vitamins

Healthy Start Scheme

You may be eligible for free vitamin supplements under the Government's Healthy Start scheme if you receive income support or income-based jobseeker's allowance. The vitamin tablets contain the recommended levels of folic acid and vitamin D plus vitamin C. For more information visit: http://www.healthystart.nhs.uk/healthy-start-vouchers


Advice on use of supplements

We recommend that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or planning a pregnancy consult their doctor, midwife or pharmacist before taking a supplement. Food supplements are not a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.




Always read the label as some supplements should NOT be taken in pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Read more like this:
The recipe for healthy eating in pregnancy
Top tips for an active pregnancy
A-Z of pregnancy niggles

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